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CHÖRTEN IN NEPAL

148,00 

1 disponibili

CHÖRTEN IN NEPAL. Architecture and buddhist votive practice in the Himalaya

 

For more than two millennia Buddhism shaped the cultures of Central, South, Southeast, and East Asia. Each territory had its own peculiar way of developing representations of the Buddha, the Bodhisattvas, and a variety of guardian deities and saints.

Of particular importance is the representation of the Buddha and his teachings in an iconic form in the shape of an impassable building. Called Stupa in Sanskrit, and Chörten in Tibetan, these structures not only characterize the urban space of the Newars in the Kathmandu Valley. They also mark the access to Tibetan villages in northern Nepal, line the trails across high passes, and stud topographically prominent places. By their thousands, they transform wilderness into a landscape that promises shelter, protection, and well-being.

584 maps, architectural drawings, and photographs, produced from 1970 to 2008, document the rich cultural heritage of the Tibetan and Tamang enclaves along the range of the high Himalaya.

Niels Gutschow, born in Hamburg in 1941, studied architecture in Darmstadt and completed his PhD on Japanese cities in 1973. He worked as a planner and a municipal conservation officer in the 1970s, before turning to the ­history of architecture and planning and architectural anthro­pology. Since 1980, he has also been devoted to the history of ­urban planning in the wake of the Second World War. He first came to Nepal in 1962 and worked on the architecture and ­urban rituals of Nepal and India. In 1970, he visited Lower ­Mustang for the first time, before returning in 1988 to start an extensive survey of Chörten, focussing on villages such as Kag, Kyinga, Dzar, and Te. Surveys followed in ­Sindhupalcok (1976), Dhading (1982–2018), Humla (1990), Dolpo (1990), Mugu (1986 and 1998), and Upper Mustang (1992). Recently, he served as chief technical advisor in an effort to preserve the temples on Patan Darbar Square which had collapsed in the 2015 earthquake. His publications to date include: The Nepalese Caitya: 1500 Years of Buddhist Votive Architecture in the Kathmandu Valley (1997); Architecture of the Newars: A History of Building Typologies and Details in Nepal (2013); and (with J. Düwel) A Blessing in Disguise: War and Town Planning in Europe 1940–1945. Gutschow lives and works in Abtsteinach, Germany and Bhaktapur, Nepal.

CHÖRTEN IN NEPAL

148,00 

1 disponibili

CHÖRTEN IN NEPAL. Architecture and buddhist votive practice in the Himalaya

 

For more than two millennia Buddhism shaped the cultures of Central, South, Southeast, and East Asia. Each territory had its own peculiar way of developing representations of the Buddha, the Bodhisattvas, and a variety of guardian deities and saints.

Of particular importance is the representation of the Buddha and his teachings in an iconic form in the shape of an impassable building. Called Stupa in Sanskrit, and Chörten in Tibetan, these structures not only characterize the urban space of the Newars in the Kathmandu Valley. They also mark the access to Tibetan villages in northern Nepal, line the trails across high passes, and stud topographically prominent places. By their thousands, they transform wilderness into a landscape that promises shelter, protection, and well-being.

584 maps, architectural drawings, and photographs, produced from 1970 to 2008, document the rich cultural heritage of the Tibetan and Tamang enclaves along the range of the high Himalaya.

Niels Gutschow, born in Hamburg in 1941, studied architecture in Darmstadt and completed his PhD on Japanese cities in 1973. He worked as a planner and a municipal conservation officer in the 1970s, before turning to the ­history of architecture and planning and architectural anthro­pology. Since 1980, he has also been devoted to the history of ­urban planning in the wake of the Second World War. He first came to Nepal in 1962 and worked on the architecture and ­urban rituals of Nepal and India. In 1970, he visited Lower ­Mustang for the first time, before returning in 1988 to start an extensive survey of Chörten, focussing on villages such as Kag, Kyinga, Dzar, and Te. Surveys followed in ­Sindhupalcok (1976), Dhading (1982–2018), Humla (1990), Dolpo (1990), Mugu (1986 and 1998), and Upper Mustang (1992). Recently, he served as chief technical advisor in an effort to preserve the temples on Patan Darbar Square which had collapsed in the 2015 earthquake. His publications to date include: The Nepalese Caitya: 1500 Years of Buddhist Votive Architecture in the Kathmandu Valley (1997); Architecture of the Newars: A History of Building Typologies and Details in Nepal (2013); and (with J. Düwel) A Blessing in Disguise: War and Town Planning in Europe 1940–1945. Gutschow lives and works in Abtsteinach, Germany and Bhaktapur, Nepal.